The Unbreakable Boy

The Unbreakable Boy

The Unbreakable Boy is about an ordinary man with an extraordinary son who is teaching him how to live. Like any other teenager, Austin loves pizza, movies, dancing, and girls. But unlike other 18-year-old boys, Austin has a rare brittle bone disease, which means he has broken almost all of his bones. He was locked away in a mental ward while still a child. And he’s autistic. But Austin doesn’t let any of that stop him. The Unbreakable Boy is the story of Austin’s joyful embrace of life’s tragedies and triumphs, where suffering a broken back is a minor inconvenience and the quest for the ultimate strawberry milkshake just might be the best day of his life. Austin is a one in a billion miracle, and as his father Scott has learned, life with Austin is like a wild carnival ride. The only thing that keeps Scott buckled in is his faith in God and the conviction that he was chosen as Austin’s father and one day it will all make sense. The Unbreakable Boy is the story of a broken boy who, day by day, is teaching his father how to live.

Author

Susy Flory is a New York Times best selling author who grew up on the back of a quarter horse in Northern California. She first started writing at the Newhall Signal with the legendary Scotty Newhall, an ex-editor of the San Francisco Chronicle and a one-legged cigar-smoking curmudgeon who ruled the newsroom from behind a dented metal desk where he pounded out stories on an Underwood Typewriter. She taught high school English and journalism, then quit in 2004 to write full time for publications such as Focus on the Family, Guideposts Books, Today’s Christian, and Today’s Christian Woman. Susy is the author or co-author of seven books, including So Long Status Quo: What I Learned From the Women Who Changed the World (Beacon Hill, 2009), as well as the runaway bestseller she co-wrote with blind 9-11 survivor Michael Hingson, called Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero (Harper Collins, 2011).